YARROW: Properties, Uses and Benefits

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Family: Asteraceae

Species: Achillea Millefolium

Common Name: Yarrow, Milfoil, Thousand-Leaf, Achillea, Woundwort,

Achillea Millefolium is an erect, herbaceous, perennial plant that produces one to several stems. It’s leaves are almost feathery and  and arranged spirally on the stems. The inflorescence consist in a flat-topped cluster white to pink in color,  visited by many insects because of their strong scent.

Yarrow is a common weed, an herbaceous perennial plant native to the Northern hemisphere that grows freely in grassland, roadsides and other sites with well draining ground. Easily recognizable for its feathery leaves, strong stems and distinctive flower heads.

Yarrow leaves are edible and best when young, bitter in flavor can be an healthy touch to mixed salads. The flowers and leaves are infused into an aromatic tea. The precious essential oil is extracted just from the flowering heads, as in tinctures and macerated oils.  

MEDICINAL PROPERTIES

Yarrow has seen historical use as in traditional medicine, mostly for its astringent, tonic and stimulant effects. It is helpful in relieving fevers, shortening the duration of cold and flu. Applied topically in the form of poultice can help with skin itching and other minor conditions. Yarrow‘s a good urinary anti-septic that, when drunk as an infusion, make a useful remedy for cystitis and urinary tract infections. Some people will notice relief from their allergy symptoms by drinking a tea of yarrow and mint.

Yarrow essential oil  is among the best anti-inflammatory in nature; It can efficiently handle inflammation of any types. It improves circulation, and thereby prevents accumulation of uric acid in the joints and muscles, thus helping cure rheumatism and arthritis. The oil itself has bactericidal and fungicidal properties. the essential oil of Yarrow can help with its relaxing, anti-spasmodic effect on muscles, nerves, intestines and respiratory tracts.

 


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